Grippy Pad

Just like a tree frog’s amazing feet, the Grippy Pad will hold all sorts of things in place. And all without a single magnet, velcro strip, or sticky adhesive in sight.  By some marvel of manufacturing (don’t ask) this advanced silicone material grips everything from iPads to Sat Navs. Just slap it on your dashboard and place your items on top. Like magic, they’ll be held in place!

Just like a tree frog’s amazing feet, the Grippy Pad will hold all sorts of things in place. And all without a single magnet, velcro strip, or sticky adhesive in sight. By some marvel of manufacturing (don’t ask) this advanced silicone material grips everything from iPads to Sat Navs. Just slap it on your dashboard and place your items on top. Like magic, they’ll be held in place!



Are Multipurpose Devices Better Than Products That Perform One Function?

Some of the hottest consumer products continue to be Web-connected multipurpose devices, such as tablets and smartphones. Since the advent of the app store, there seems to be no limit to what these gadgets can do. Nothing is just a phone, a camera or a television anymore. From the WSJ:

Arguing for multi-purpose devices, Berkowitz writes:

It’s true that my GPS-enabled camera takes better pictures than my smartphone, and can tell me they were taken in California. But learning to share the pictures with friends takes more effort than it is worth. In the new marketplace, devices people can’t master in five minutes will result in a lot of returned items, which very quickly makes a product unprofitable.

Multipurpose devices offer other financial edges for manufacturers and consumers. A consumer would have to buy 10 different devices to reproduce the most popular functions in a single smartphone or tablet. Smartphones and other multipurpose devices are produced in high volumes, too, which in turn drives manufacturer costs and consumer prices lower.

Saffer writes an opposing view:

It’s not just professionals who care about quality, either. Yes, the speaker on a phone is good enough to listen to a song in a pinch. But to really enjoy the music, even your multipurpose device must be supplemented with a product like the brilliant Jambox, designed to play music loudly and well.

Makers of multipurpose devices are mostly unwilling to spend tens (and sometimes hundreds) of dollars per unit for each feature to be as good as those delivered by a high-quality single-purpose device; especially when it would add weight or heat, or eat up battery power.

More here. Via.


App Magnets

Now there's an app for keeping your kids art work on the fridge...sort of. App Magnets look like app icons-certainly a far cry from those old school plain black magnets or ones that looks like strawberries. No download or 2 year contract required!

Now there’s an app for keeping your kids art work on the fridge…sort of.
App Magnets look like app icons-certainly a far cry from those old school plain black magnets or ones that looks like strawberries.
No download or 2 year contract required!


Google is tracking you

This is no parody. We give up our right for privacy for the usage of their software. Both Facebook and Google’s entire business model is based on knowing everything about you and then selling it to advertisers.



Judge: Cell phone users ‘have no legitimate expectation of privacy’

Cellphone privacy

An American federal judge recently ruled that if someone has their cell phone turned on, their location data does not deserve protection under the Fourth Amendment, meaning law enforcement can track individuals without a search warrant. RT.com reports:

“Given the ubiquity and celebrity of geolocation technologies, an individual has no legitimate expectation of privacy in the prospective of a cellular telephone where that individual has failed to protect his privacy by taking the simple expedient of powering it off,” Brown wrote.

“As to control by the user, all of the known tracking technologies may be defeated by merely turning off the phone. Indeed – excluding apathy or inattention – the only reason that users leave cell phones turned on is so that the device can be located to receive calls. Conversely, individuals who do not want to be disturbed by unwanted telephone calls at a particular time or place simply turn their phones off, knowing that they cannot be located.”

He goes on to suggest that because there are smartphone applications available that allow users to locate people in their area with similar interests, cell phone customers should not expect their inherent right to privacy to be observed.

More here.


HuMn Wallets

HuMn Wallet in the field

HuMn Wallet in the field

The HuMn 2 wallet is a sleek, minimalist wallet that can be configured in one, two or three powder coated aluminum plates with a shock strap. The aluminum plates protect you from electronic theft by shielding your credit cards from EMI and RFID skimming. The wallet comes in a variety of colors allowing complete customization. And despite being small and streamlined, the wallet can accommodate almost all world notes.

See them here.


Routehappy Helps You Find The Best Airline

Routehappy is a flight search engine that uses flyer feedback to help you pick an airline that will make your trip happier. Routehappy lets users search for flights with Wi-Fi, power outlets, additional leg room, comfortable seats, and in-flight entertainment. The service displays details of the flight and outputs a “Happiness Score” based on total flight time, various amenities, and flyer ratings along with the usual price, airline, and other flight information.



Pli – Retro iPhone Case

Pli - Blast From the Past - iphone case

Pli is an iPhone 5 case that highlights the materials and style of mid-century modern design. Each case features a unique wood veneer inset carved from U.S. Walnut, oiled and finished for an unforgettable look. The polycarbonate shell snaps on and off an iPhone 5 with ease, providing comprehensive protection while keeping your phone’s profile sleek and unassuming.



A ‘novel’ idea for spreading literature in Africa: The cellphone

Reading using cellphone

A man wearing yellow shoes checks his phone in Kibera, Africa’s largest slum, in Nairobi, Kenya, in March. Cellphones are ‘a huge component of how consumption is happening here,’ Angela Wachuka, executive director of Kenya’s Kwani Trust says. Photo: Jerome Delay/AP

New technology and new thinking are helping African literature leapfrog the high costs of traditional publishing and reach new readers across the continent. Csmonitor.com reports:

As e-readers boom in popularity in the West, African publishers are stretching their reach with the help of a device millions already have in their pockets: their cellphones.

“You can give people instant access to work now,” says Angela Wachuka, executive director of Kenya’s Kwani Trust, which publishes the popular Kwani? literary journal. “Before, you had to rely on delivery or people coming to find you.”

Mobile internet now accounts for well over half of all web traffic in some African countries, and it is expected to grow 25-fold on the continent in the next four years, according to the Groupe Speciale Mobile Association, an industry organization.

Cellphones are “a huge component of how consumption is happening here,” Ms. Wachuka says, noting that she’s seen Kenyans devour hundreds of pages of text on their tiny screens, plowing through tell-all memoirs and other accounts of the country’s recent political turmoil.

For now anyway, much of that literature is pirated, but Kwani is taking the approach that if the e-literate get a taste for free, at least some will pay for more.


Yang Du: bags with owls and crocodiles

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… designing is about storytelling: tigers and giraffes mingle with owls and flamingos, swans and crocodiles.

Du is from Dalian, North China. She came moved London ten years ago to study and completed a BA in Fashion Print and an MA in Fashion Womenswear, both at Central Saint Martins. She gained experience with Vivienne Westwood, Giles Deacon and John Galliano.

Via Designboom



ScoreCleaner Notes: Instantly Transpose Your Ideas Onto Sheet Music

A noteworthy app - The mobile becomes a music writing tool

Need some instant musical notation to remember that little tune you just came up with? A new mobile app created by a researcher from KTH Royal Institute of Technology makes it possible to score any melody instantly and share it.

The ScoreCleaner Notes application listens to your melody, instantly writes it out in musical notation, and then makes it possible to share the written music via social media websites or email, says Sven Emtell, who developed the app as part of his computer engineering master’s degree project at KTH with collaborator Sven Ahlbäck, who is now a professor at Stockholm Music University.

Users need not know how to read or write music, Emtell says. Even playing an instrument is optional. The user can hum or sing the melody into their mobile’s microphone, and the app instantly displays the notation on the screen, with the right key, tempo and time signature.

“We want to revolutionize the music industry,” Emtell says. “This app is revolutionary because it has the potential to unleash the creativity of musicians and music teachers worldwide.”

With the growing interest in online musical collaboration, such an app could do just that.

More here.