Noise cancelling on your window

Silence has become a scarce and almost luxurious experience; it’s one of the experiences I look forward to when returning home to Eastern Canada. I’ve tried all kinds of noise cancelling techniques to help quell the noise pollution in the building where we live but poor building standards, a culture that loves noise, and loose enforcement of when you can use that concrete drill makes it impossible. This pebble like device you can see here lets you reclaim that silence for your home. It turns your window into an advanced noise cancelling system that allows you to eliminate and/оr control the sounds that pass through. I hope we see these mobile-like devices in the real world soon so that we can take our own personal decibel level with us where ever we go.

Sono



Blackphone

Silent Circle and Geeksphone have partnered to combine best-of-breed hardware with all the skills and experience necessary to offer, Blackphone the world’s first smartphone to put privacy and control ahead of everything else. Ahead of carriers. Ahead of advertising. Blackphone is re-shaping the landscape of personal communications.

It would be great to have this option in the marketplace.



Phone calls a thing of the past

Photo by Maggsinho

Photo by Maggsinho

The continuing decline of telephone culture: A recent Pew report showed that in 2012, 80 percent of cellphone users used their phones for texting; in 2007, just 58 percent did. In late 2007, according to Nielsen, monthly texts outpaced phone calls for the first time. Personally I seldom use the phone app. on my iPhone, any conversations, which are few, are done over Skype or Facetime.

As a freelance writer, I also have days, even busy ones, when I don’t speak a word aloud. Frequently, I conduct all professional and personal interactions by email or text from my apartment. A simulacrum of a bustling office is achieved by a quick survey of Facebook posts or Twitter messages.

Ten years ago, still in the social-media stone age of Friendster and not yet texting, I often talked to friends on the phone during the day, sometimes while walking or running errands.

Now, of course, hardly anyone calls, at least not without a pre-emptive “Are you free to talk?” text. Last month, I accidentally removed one of the bottom four primary buttons on my iPhone screen, and it took me a good five minutes to realize it was the “phone” function.

Work From Home? A Phone Call May Be a Rare Thing