iPhoneography: Smartphone art

Smartphone art
University of Cambridge sociology student Zack McCune set out to explore peoples desire to share personal content with global networks. He spent four months examining user behaviour in social media’s latest trends: networks that communicate in mobile photography.

As mobile phone cameras improve, emerging forms of social media are basing themselves in ‘iPhoneography’. While social media is often held up as an example of the increasingly vacuous and self-obsessed nature of society, research into these new networks shows they can encourage creativity, and even provide users with a therapeutic outlet.
This introduced the field of smartphone photography, or ‘iPhoneography’. The rapid increase in mobile camera sophistication is the latest stage in the shrinking space between seeing and sharing. “Since the Kodak Brownie, through to the Polaroid Instant and into the age of digital photography, technology has been closing the time between taking a photo and sharing it” says McCune. “Smart phone cameras and apps like instagram mean that you can offer a photo to global networks faster than typed text in many instances.”

Smartphone art